Tag Archives: Human resource management

Employee Feedback without Unicorns

I am talking at #Agile2017 about giving meaningful, helpful, and humane, employee feedback. The secret is that the employee needs to be central.

TL; DR

The only person qualified to give advice to an employee regarding their career is the employee. That means we need to empower the people who work for- and with- us to analyze their career. If we can empower people to better their lives they will do more and do it better.

The only person qualified to give advice to an employee regarding their career is the employee. Click To Tweet

Questing

What if employees looked forward to receiving feedback? What if they found feedback valuable and able to improve their lives? What would that look like? How would we provide that environment? Our department asked these questions and the whole department swarmed to tackle the problem. The solution we came up with worked well in our context, and I also believe the lessons learned while figuring the answer out are valuable to others.

Personal

The first lesson we learned was that if we want to give meaningful feedback to individuals was that it had to be individual. That means we must do things to consider, protect, and appreciate, the single person who is receiving the feedback.

Our solution, currently, is to do a personal retrospective for the person. This retrospective is private, personal, confidential and facilitated by a peer who the person trusts.

Trust

It is important that the retrospective is personal and private. Without this security, there is no safety. Without safety, truth is limited, constrained and lost. The goal is to allow the employee to have real insight into how they can improve their career path, their entire career path, not limited to that within the company.

Facilitation

It is also important that this retrospective is facilitated. Facilitation gives the opportunity for the employee to explain their thoughts to another. The process of explaining leads to insight.

The facilitator is to listen, and ask questions only to gain understanding. They are not to judge or comment. They are not to burden the person whose retro it is with their own opinions. We decided to provide facilitation training for everyone who is interested in being a facilitator.

The facilitator is invited by the employee who is undergoing the retrospective. Invitation is important, as it signifies trust. It is just as important the invited facilitator be allowed to refuse without explanation. Not everyone is comfortable with facilitation.

The last thing to note about facilitation is that the facilitator will make mistakes. After all, these are not professional facilitators. Mistakes are okay. Even if they disregard all their training, just by being there for the retrospective, they will make the retrospective more successful.

Output

The content of the retrospective is private and personal. The things talked about during this meeting need to be protected, unless there is a legal obligation. If not, we again lose trust.

The product derived from this retrospective is a set of possible goals. One or two of these goals will be decided upon and acted on. They will be shared with the director who will help to achieve the goals. He uses this information to understand the ebbs and flows throughout the department.

When a goal is not achieved, the director needs to know if the department hindered its progress, and if so, how. If a goal is completed the director wants to know how the employee felt about the goal, if there is more that can be done to improve upon the accomplishment, or if knowledge can be shared.

Rewards

These goals, the retro, and information gained through this process, except where there is legal obligation, is disconnected from compensation. This frees us from the burden of creating an accidental game where the outcomes can become harmful.

The only reward is the ability to take an analytical look at your career and take steps to move it into a direction you want.

Plug

Please come to my talk, where I will talk in depth on this. I hope to see you there.

I will be watching Facilitation Without Unicorns at #Agile2017 Click To Tweet

Onboarding a human into a human system

Onboarding is much more than a meeting with HR, it is the integration of new person.

TL; DR

Onboarding is an important endeavor. If we approach it seriously and conscientiously we can make the new person feel more welcomed and part of a team.

Initial Onboarding Meeting

Human Resources has a job to do with its onboarding process which is important for all kinds of reasons. This onboarding covers legal issues and is often the first, if not only, exposure a new hire has with the company’s culture as defined by its executives. However, this should only be the start of the onboarding process.

Integration

It can take several months to integrate a new person into an existing team, so that they are emotionally and mentally part of that team. During this time, we need to help them, guide them, and be there to support them as they have questions.

Our goal in onboarding should be to help and guide a new hire in becoming a member of a team. Click To Tweet

My department has extended its onboarding process to three months and provided the new hire with a buddy. We choose a buddy from the newest employee who has been at the company at least six months, who are on the same team as the new hire, and is willing to accept the responsibility. The buddy is chosen this way to maximize the empathy for the new hire since buddies have the most recent memory of what it was like to be a new hire.

Buddies

They are a buddy, not a mentor. Buddies are there to answer questions and give support. They are not there to teach. Which is to say buddies are not given any authority over the new hire and are a model of the flat organization structure of the department.

Department and Team

We also extend the onboarding process to the team and the department. When a person is added to a team, that team is no longer the same team. To emphasize this fact, the team, the new hire, and their buddy all undergo training about the Satir Process Change Model by Virginia Satir.

This creates a cycle of repetitive learning for the new hire. The new hire learns about the process as part of their onboarding. They then learn about it again with each new hire brought onto their team. They again learn it when they become a buddy. We do this because we believe understanding of the Satir Process Change Model is important to the successful integration of a new person into an existing system.

The team and department then undergo activities to introduce the new hire to everyone, and to introduce everyone to them. These activities might include a Market of Skills, a Lean Coffee on hobbies, or many other activities. One of the main goals of an onboarding process is to make the new person feel welcomed, wanted, and appreciated. These activities done over a three-month period seem right to me.

Request for Comment

How do you, and your company/department/team approach onboarding in a new way? I would love to hear about it.